Rabbit's Corner

Learn More About Your Rabbit

Similar to cats and dogs, rabbits make wonderful pets. Each rabbit having their own personality and the ability to learn tricks and play games. They also have some particular home and veterinary care needs which are discussed here.

Parasite Control

Fleas can attack rabbit too! There are some excellent, easy to use flea control products available including Advantage and Revolution

Rabbits can be infected with either fur mites or ear mites. Fur mites usually cause a dandruff type skin condition over the shoulders of the rabbit. It is normally not itchy. Rabbits with ear mites frequently scratch at their ears and earwax may be visible.

If your bunny has any of these signs, please bring to us to examine him/her so the condition can be treated and your pet made more comfortable.

Rabbits have teeth that continually grow hence overgrown incisors (front teeth) and molars (cheek teeth) can occur. We often see rabbits with overgrown teeth due to poor diet or hereditary factors. They may form spurs on their molar teeth if they are not worn down naturally by chewing roughage. Some rabbits need their teeth burred down regularly under anaesthetic if they suffer from spurs.

Please contact us if your rabbit suffer any dental problem.

Dental Care

Feeding

The most common problems with rabbits are all diet related. Remember a rabbit is not a small dog or cat. They are in fact more like a cow or sheep, in that they constantly graze and their guts are constantly digesting.

Food needs to be available to them at all times or a lack of it can risk the bowls shutting down and this can result in death. A rabbit off their food for more than 12 hours should be brought in as an emergency to us!

Rabbits are designed to eat grass. Therefore grass and hay are the best diets for them. The pelleted and flaked foods is a diet of fast-food to the rabbit – tasty but not healthy – so this should make up only a maximum of 20% of their diet. Green leafy vegetables – spinach, cabbage, cauliflower leaves, lettuce, broccoli and root vegetables like carrots are great for variety and nutrition. Some fruit may be given as a treat – apple, pear, strawberry.A high percentage of fibre also helps control teeth growth. Rabbits groom themselves like cats and therefore develop hairballs – a healthy diet prevents hairballs becoming a problem.

Rabbit fed on a high carbohydrate/low fibre diet can suffer from a condition called gut stasis. This can also be bought on by stress, lack of exercise or fur ingestion. This causes the gut to stop fermenting food and no faeces are produced. Rabbits suffering from gut stasis will stop eating, become depressed and stop producing faeces. This condition can become serious after just a few hours so if you notice changes in your rabbit you should have him/her checked as soon as possible.

It is important for rabbits, as well as enjoying it, to have a good brush which reduces the possibility of fur balls and gut obstruction.

Nail trimming is also essential as rabbits’ nails can get very sharp indeed. Please bring to us and we can show you how you can do this at home.

Grooming

Neutering

Rabbits can reproduce from an early age and unfortunately it is only when an owner finds a newly born litter of rabbits that they realise that they don’t have two males or females after all! Rabbits are notoriously difficult to sex.

Male rabbits are usually desexed from 4-6 months of age. Female rabbits should also be desexed between 4-6 months of age.

Call us for appointment today.

 

Rabbits can reproduce from an early age and unfortunately it is only when an owner finds a newly born litter of rabbits that they realise that they don’t have two males or females after all! Rabbits are notoriously difficult to sex.

Male rabbits are usually desexed from 4-6 months of age. Female rabbits should also be desexed between 4-6 months of age.

Neutering male rabbits is a good idea as they can often become aggressive when older.

Spaying female rabbits means that as well as preventing pregnancy, we prevent the development of uterine cancer. Uterine cancer is nearly always fatal and can occur even in young rabbits.

Nutrition

VISIT OR CALL

VPAC Kuchai Exchange
A-G-3, Jalan Kuchai Maju 13,, Kuchai Exchange, 58200 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

info@vpac.com.my

 

 
VPAC Solaris Mont Kiara
5 (G Floor), Jalan Solaris 4, Solaris Mont Kiara, 50480, KL, Malaysia

enquries@vpac.com.my

HOURS OF OPERATION

VPAC Kuchai Exchange

8:00am-9:00pm Mon & Tues
8:00am-6:00pm Weds – Fri
CLOSED Sat & Sun

VPAC Solaris Mont Kiara

8:00am-6:00pm Mon & Tues
8:00am-9:00pm Weds – Sat
CLOSED Sun

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